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What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis?

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What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis?
What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis?

Pes anserine tendonitis is the inflammation of the 3 tendons that run along the inner lower aspect of the knee joint. The condition is also called “goosefoot” tendonitis because the 3 tendons together give the appearance of a goosefoot at their point of attachment on the shinbone. 

What causes Pes Anserine Tendonitis?

Pes Anserine Tendonitis may be caused by repetitive activities or sports that require involve a lot of cutting movements while running such as basketball or soccer, abnormal biomechanics, muscle imbalances, improper footwear, or some kind of knee pathology such as osteoarthritis. 

What are the Symptoms of Pes Anserine Tendonitis?

You may experience pain in the inner aspect of the knee when bending or straightening your leg, pain with climbing stairs, swelling around the knee, loss or range of motion, or a sensation of the knee giving way. 

Treatment of Pes Anserine Tendonitis

Most people diagnosed with Pes Anserine Tendonitis are able to make a full recovery with physical therapy. Here are some exercises that can help alleviate symptoms and get you back to your active lifestyle.

  • What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis

    VMO Straight Leg Raise

    Turn your foot slightly outward. Tighten the muscles on the front of your thigh and lift the entire leg from the bed no higher than the opposite knee. Make sure to keep your knee completely straight and maintain outward foot position.

    Hold 10 seconds | Repeat 10times | Perform 1-2 sessions per day

  • What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis

    Prone Quad Stretch

    Lay on your stomach with strap around your involved foot or ankle. Gently pull your foot towards your hip until a moderate stretch is felt in the front of your thigh. Make sure to keep your knees together. 

    Hold 30 Seconds | Repeat 2 times | Perform 1-2 sessions per day

  • What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis

    Seated Hamstring Stretch

    Place your leg straight on the bed with your opposite foot on the floor. Keeping your knee straight and your toes pointed up, slowly lean forward until you feel a stretch in the back of the knee/thigh. Keep your back straight and do not tuck your chin, no bouncing. 

    Hold 30 seconds | Repeat 2 times | Perform 1-2 sessions per day

  • What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis

    Standing ITB Stretch

    Stand with the involved side toward a counter and cross the opposite leg in front of the involved leg. Hold onto the counter and gently lean the involved hip into the counter until a stretch is felt on the side of the hip.

    Hold 30 seconds | Repeat 2times | Perform 1-2 sessions per day

  • What is Pes Anserine Tendonitis

    Butterfly Adductor Stretch

    Sit with your feet together and knees apart, gently push your knees to the floor until a stretch is felt in the groin. Maintain a straight back, use support if needed.

    Hold 30 seconds | Repeat 2 times | Perform 1-2 sessions per day

For an in-depth evaluation of your knee pain and personalized treatment recommendation, please call us at (248) 957-0300

Dr. Frisch is an orthopedic surgeon focusing on minimally invasive hip and knee joint replacement as well as regenerative treatments for enhanced healing. He believes in creating a very personalized experience with the highest level of service. For all appointments & inquiries, please contact our offices located in Rochester and River District, MI.

Credibility Links

  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • American Medical Association
  • American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons
  • Mid-America Orthopaedic Association
  • Michigan Institute for Advanced Surgery Center